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Thursday, Apr. 17, 2014

Your view: A place for youths

Thursday, June 15, 2006

I seen some one complaining about skateboarders in "Speakout" and would like to make a suggestion to the City of Sikeston and other communities about things like skateboarding, rollerblading, bicycles, teenage bands and other "out-of-the-norm" activities.

"Putting skate boarders in line

I would like to comment on "Simply being kids." Can my kids come to your house and skateboard in your driveway and on your fence railing, on your front porch? Better yet, can they come in and skateboard on your floors, basement and down your stairs? I'm sure the answer is no. And why is the answer no? One, probably because you don't own a house. Two, you would be afraid you might be sued. Three, you would not want them there because you need to sleep, mow the yard or maybe run a business from your house and they are bothering your customers. There are a number of reasons that kids aren't and should not be allowed to skateboard on private property. But the main reason is that you don't own the property. You didn't buy the property, you don't pay the payment, you don't pay the taxes and you don't pay the insurance. The only thing you do is cause property damage and cause problems for other people. The best thing you can do is go to the bank, take out a loan and build a place for your kids to skateboard. Then you can have the payment, taxes, insurance and liability of being sued."

1. "Two, you would be afraid you might be sued." But hasn't children been hurt or injured playing baseball, soccer, football or basketball? All of which is played on a consistent basis at the complex in Sikeston and here at our local parks also in East Prairie. When a child gets injured playing one of these "normal" sports, does the park district get sued? I think not.

2. "Three, you would not want them there because you need to sleep, mow the yard or maybe run a business from your house and they are bothering your customers need to sleep"? How about those loud motorcycles that go roaring up and down the road and you can hear them for miles? Does anyone bother to think that these motorcycles can KILL people and HAVE? And that kids playing "music" (whether it be from a stereo or a local band) get tickets from the local law enforcement officers and some times even the PARENTS are JAILED because their children choose to listen, create or practice music. All of which HARMS no one.

3. May I suggest this to our local community leaders? That we (the taxpayers) pay to build and maintain our parks. Therefore, why can't we have a SKATEBOARD PARK like a lot of other and more progressive communities have? And why can't we set aside a time and place for our young local music talents to practice and perform their music? Why does this region of the country refuse to expand out the "NORM" and be more progressive in pursuing what interests of OTHER teenage activities that are vastly becoming the "NORM" in larger and more progressive communities.

Not all teenagers enjoy baseball, football, soccer and basketball. And not only that, but only a certain amount of teams are allowed, therefore, limiting the number of youngsters that can play in these "NORMAL" activities.

4. "The best thing you can do is go to the bank, take out a loan and build a place for your kids to skateboard" This is what I referred to in the above paragraph concerning WHO actually PAYS for our parks and recreational facilities. Everyone in that particular community does! It is my belief that ANY CARING community would want to provide any and all alternative activities to our teens other than drugs or alcohol.

As a parent who lost a young talented musician in an automobile accident in 2004, If I had the money to provide such activities to our local youths, I would GLADLY build such a place as a skatepark and a building for our young musicians to create and practice their talents, instead of being forced to just go riding around and doing nothing with their God given talents.

Sincerely

Randy Bramlett